Punyah Yoga Blog

UTTHITA HASTA PADANGUSTHASANA–'C'

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 27 Nov 2019

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘C’ is a quick transition asana that follows Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B.’ It is only held for one breath before transitioning to Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘D.’ This asana involves reaching the leg as close to the chest as possible while staying on one foot. It is very challenging and is best practiced daily as part of the Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana series.

Benefits of Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘C’:
Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘C’ strengthens the hamstrings and adductor muscles, as well as your powers of focus, concentration, and balance. As with all the other Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana positions, Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘C’ strengthens both the ankle joint and the entire leg.

Since it follows directly after Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B,’ review how to complete that asana Read More

UTTHITA HASTA PADANGUSTHASANA–'B'

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 27 Nov 2019

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana B is an incredible asana that involves keen concentration and balance. Our founder, Hemant Singh, has been quoted saying, “Your focus needs more focus” to wobbling students in this asana.

Benefits of Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B’:

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B’ strengthens the hamstrings and adductor muscles. Completing Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B’ successfully also improves one’s focus, concentration, and balance. As it is challenging for the ankles and leg muscles, Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘B’ strengthens both the ankle joint and the entire leg.

Learn the ins and outs of this impressive asana by checking out the details below. It follows directly after Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘A,’ so to review how to complete that asana Read More

UTTHITA HASTA PADANGUSTHASANA–'A'

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 04 Nov 2019

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana “A” is the first expression of the A, B, C, and D in the Ashtanga primary series. This is an incredible single-leg balance pose that will make you feel like a balancing warrior, without any Virabhadrasana being involved. It’s an incredible way to work on flexibility in the hips and hamstrings while working on balancing at the same time.

Benefits of Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘A’:

Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana ‘A’ strengthens the hamstrings and adductor muscles. This asana also greatly improves one’s sense of balance. It strengthens the ankles and all the muscles in the legs as you stabilize on one leg. As with any balancing asana, it calms the mind and improves your powers of focus and concentration.

Give Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana “A” a try by following the steps below.

Begin in Samasthi position.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Stand firmly on the Read More

PARSVOTTANASANA

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 04 Nov 2019

Parsvottanasana is commonly known as the pyramid pose. It is a deceptively difficult asana that most beginners think should be as easy as pie when they see it demonstrated. However, Parsvottanasana is an enormously challenging pose for the hamstring muscles. Just give it a try and see for yourself!

Benefits of Parsvottanasana:-

Parsvottanasana massages the digestive organs and improves digestion. It also helps build flexibility in the hamstrings as it deeply challenges the hamstring muscle. Pyramid pose is also known for helping to relieve menstrual cramps.

Read below to find out how to correctly do a pyramid pose for the ashtanga primary sequence.

Begin in Samasthi position.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Join hands in prayer position behind the back and then step your right foot less than a meter back, Read More

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘D’

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 30 Oct 2019

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘D’ is the last wide legged forward fold in the Ashtanga Primary Series. It is different from the other Prasarita Padottanasanas in that the arms are locked onto the big toes. By using the strength of the biceps and the arms, one can draw one’s head even closer to the ground. It is arguably the most intense of the Prasarita Padottanasanas in the primary sequence. Keep reading below to find out how to receive all the big benefits of this asana.

Benefits of Prasarita Padottanasana ‘D’: -

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘D’ strengthens and stretches the inner legs, as well as the back of the legs. It also stretches the spine. It is known to relieve a mild backache as the forward fold relaxes the lower back muscles. Prasarita Padottanasana ‘D’ involves locking the first two fingers and the thumb around the big toes and flaring the elbows out so they are in line with the wrists. Read More

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘C’

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 30 Oct 2019

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘C’ is a powerful wide-legged forward fold with the hands interlocked and launching over the head. It can feel intense. And we mean that in the best way!

Benefits of Prasarita Padottanasana ‘C’ :-

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘C’ strengthens and stretches the inner legs, as well as the back of the legs. It also stretches the spine. It is known to relieve a mild backache, as the forward fold relaxes the lower back muscles. As Prasarita Padottanasana ‘C’ involves interlocking the hands and taking the arms over the head, it engages the upper back muscles and the shoulder muscles. Lastly, to hang with the head heavy, towards the floor, encourages blood flow towards the brain which has been said to calm the mind.

Check out our steps below, making note of our tips and tricks for how to complete this asana correctly. Stretch on yogis! Read More

PRASARITA PADOTTANASANA ‘B'

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 30 Sep 2019

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘B’ can feel like magic if you do it right. It can take small adjustments to feel this asana deep in your muscles and bones. It is easy to simply place the hands at the hips and fall forward and think, wow nothing is happening. However, if you follow our steps below, paying close attention to the Tips for Successfully Completing Prasarita Padottanasana ‘B’ section, then you will feel a big change in this asana!

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘B’ is the second wide legged forward fold in the Ashtanga primary series sequence. It is identified merely by the letter ‘B.’ It is followed directly by Prasarita Padottanasana ‘A,’ and you do not need to return to Samashti base position before moving on to the Prasarita Padottanasana ‘B’ asana. Keep your legs in the same position throughout the entire A, B, C, and D sequence.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Jump to the right and feet parallel. Toes pointed slightly inward. The distance between the feet will Read More

PRASARITA PADOTTANASANA 'A'

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 27 Sep 2019

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘A’ is a wonderful stretch for the inner thighs, as well as the entire hamstring muscle. It’s also known to relieve mild back pain for those out there that need a lower back massage but just can’t find time for an appointment. Treat yourself to a little Prasarita Padottanasana ‘A’ instead!

Prasarita Padottanasana ‘A’ is one of four wide legged forward fold asanas in the Ashtanga Primary Series. There is an A, B, C, and D that are included in the primary series. Here we will discuss the first Prasarita Padottanasana variation of the sequence, identified by the letter ‘A.’

Begin in Samasthi position.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Jump to the right, feet parallel, hands on hip joints. Toes pointed slightly inward. The distance between the feet will vary based on your height, but slightly more than one meter is a good idea for how wide.

(2) Dve - Exhale - Bend forward from the hips, Read More

UTTHITA PARSVAKONASANA

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 25 Sep 2019

Utthita Parsvakonasana is commonly referred to as extended side angle pose. This asana is a wonderful pose where you feel the power of the body extending outwards and upwards. Utthita Parsvakonasana stretches almost the entire body from the shoulders and chest, all the way down through your legs. Enjoy the full body stretch and strength that Utthita Parsvakonasana provides! Let’s walk through the how-to steps together.

Begin in Samasthi position.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Jump to right, arms out to sides, left heels slightly turned in.

(2) Dve - Exhale - Bend right knee over right ankle and extend right arm out as far as possible before placing it on the floor directly outside of right foot. Launch the left arm over the head, extending it as far as possible while keeping the arm straight.

Hold the posture and breathe for 5 breaths. (3) Trini - Inhale - Come up slowly.

(4) Chatvari - Exhale - Down to the other side. Read More

PARIVRTTA PARSVAKONASANA

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 25 Sep 2019

Are you looking for step-by-step instructions on how to do Parivrtta Parsvakonasana, Revolved Side Angle pose? Look no further than right here. We took this complicated, twisting asana that challenges the body to twist so deeply all while grounding the back heel into the ground, and simplified it into a few steps so you can day-by-day work at deepening your Parivrtta Parsvakonasana asana in your yoga practice.

Parivrtta Parsvakonasana continues from Utthita Parsvakonasana.

(1) Ekam - Inhale - Jump to right, arms out to sides, left heels slightly turned in to the right. Your feet should be approximately 1 meter apart, perhaps slightly wider if you are tall. Your right heel and left heel are aligned, while your right food is held at a 90 degree angle Read More

Parivrtta Trikonasana

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 19 Aug 2019

Parivrtta Trikonasana is the revolved version of Utthita Trikonasana and is commonly known as the 'Revolved Triangle Pose'. This asana is notoriously difficult to perform correctly. We encourage you to use the modification we specify below if you are having any problems executing this asana. Slowly, with time and continuous practice, the body will open up and will allow more rotation. It can take years to work on this asana so no need to rush the process!

Benefits of Parivrtta Trikonasana:

As Parivritta Trikonasana twists the abdomen, it helps relieve constipation and digestive problems. Also, given the movement of the lower back, it does aide in reducing lower back pain. This asana stretches the legs, hips, and spine while it opens the chest to expand the lungs and improve respiration Read More

Utthita Trikonasana

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 19 Aug 2019

Utthita Trikonasana is commonly referred to as the Triangle Pose as it forms a triangle out of the body. Proper alignment is surprisingly tricky to achieve in this asana. One can find it easy to move into the pose and assume you have completed the pose correctly. Note that there are very particular stretches you should feel in certain areas of the body. Done incorrectly, Utthita Trikonasana does not offer the necessary benefits to the practitioner.

Benefits of Utthita Trikonasana:

Utthita Trikonasana strengthens the thighs, knees, and ankles as it simultaneously stretches the muscles in the hips, groin, hamstrings, chest, and calves. This asana is excellent for opening and strengthening the sides of the body. This asana also gives us a sense of how to balance the body when performing the standing sequence from thighs to knees to ankles. Read More

Padahastasana

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 19 Aug 2019

Padahastasana is the pose that follows Padangusthasana in the Ashtanga Primary Series. Often referred to as the "Gorilla pose", this asana deeply stretches the entire back of the legs. We are sure you will enjoy the stretch that this asana provides and its restorative properties.

Benefits of Padahastasana:

Padahastasana stimulates the adrenal and pineal glands which help balance hormone levels. It also is believed in Ayurveda that Padahastasana correlates with the Vata Dosha which helps ground the element of air in the body. Moreover, Padahastasana relaxes the lower back muscles and helps dramatically helps increase flexibility in the hamstrings. Read More

Padangusthasana

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 25 Jul 2019

Padangusthasana is one of the most popular forward fold asanas in yoga that always feels wonderful to surrender to. It is the first asana you enter to after you complete your sun salutations in Ashtanga Yoga.

Benefits of this asana: It works on loosening the hamstring and calf muscles. This asana has wonderful and beneficial effects on the digestive system. It is good for anxiety as well! The breath will get smoother and longer, which relaxes the body more and more

Let’s dive into how to correctly do this pose!

Begin in Samasthi position.

  1. Ekam - Inhale - Start with feet hip-width apart and parallel to each other.
  2. Dve - Exhale - Bend forward and catch your big toes with first two fingers and close with the thumb. Hold the posture and breathe for 5 breaths.
  3. Trini - Inhale - Head up and look between your eyebrows. Don't change position, just release the breath. Read More

What Is Dristi

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 18 Jul 2019

Dristi means 'vision' or 'insight'. In Ashtanga yoga, it corresponds both to a specific gazing point during the practice as well as the feeling or sense that accompanies the gaze.

There are 9 Dristis in asana practice, which include:

  • Urdhva (upward)
  • Bhrumadhya (third eye)
  • Nasagrai (tip of the nose)
  • Parsva (right side)
Read More

The Practice

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 17 Jul 2019

Hemant Singh, the founder of Punyah Yoga, wants to share his thoughts on establishing one's daily practice of Ashtanga yoga for beginners.

To start, it is important that you learn and practice under the guidance of a regular practitioner. Choose one who has studied the Ashtanga method from the right source and Paramapara (which is Sanskrit for lineage).

Make it a habit of going to a yoga studio/centre near you and try to show up each and every day, regardless of how good or bad you do in the class. Ego might come faster than you think. You might want to enter into a particular pose from the first day just by looking around and seeing other regular practitioners. Read More

Yoga and 2 Different Yoga Types Explained

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 25 Jun 2019

What is Yoga?
Yoga means “yoke.” No matter what type of yoga you are practising, the definition is always rooted in the word yoke. It is a union between the mind, body, soul, and supreme higher consciousness.

An important definition of yoga was given in the Bhagavad Gita when Lord Krishna said: “Samatvam Yoga Uchyate.” which means 'The balance of our own existence is yoga'. When everything is truly in balance, not only our body but our thoughts and emotions as well, then yoga is achieved.

Lord Krishna defines yoga a second time in the Bhagavad Gita as “Yoga Karmasu Kaushalam.” Here it means 'Yoga is perfectly skilled action or behaviour'. Read More

What is Ashtanga Yoga and What is a Class Like

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 10 Jun 2019

There are many yoga studios and shalas in Rishikesh that offer Ashtanga courses. However, not all strictly teach according to tradition and lineage.

At Punyah Yoga, we are one of the few in Rishikesh that teach Ashtanga Yoga stringently as taught by Pattabhi Jois. We teach as it was taught with no modifications. We do not skip postures, nor do we change asanas.

Students of our Ashtanga classes are expected to attempt every asana - even the most difficult postures. There is also Sanskrit counting and focus is on the breath and on gazing points. Read More

Who Is Cooking Your Food

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 16 May 2019

All of our teacher training certification programs and courses come with food and accommodation included. Punyah Yoga provides two meals a day for our students: brunch and dinner. These two meals are substantial and are part of the yogic diet. We know you might have some qualms or worries about the food here, so we wanted to share more about the provided meals and about who is cooking your food.

Meet The Head Chef Who Cooks Up A Storm!
Meet Chandra Adhikari. Chandra, who commonly goes by her nickname Channa, is the mastermind behind all the culinary delights at Punyah Yoga. She learned to cook from her mother and eventually fell in love with the kitchen at twelve years old. Channa has a vast wealth of knowledge about every ingredient she cooks with... Read More

The Story Behind the name Punyah Yoga

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 09 May 2019

When the founders of Punyah Yoga decided to open a yoga shala in Rishikesh, they had quite a brainstorming session! What would be the perfect name for the shala? There were many different ideas on the table and weeks went by as they discussed the merits of different options. But when the word “Punyah” was brought up one day, it was immediately seen as the perfect fit.

In India, the word punyah is very common. Most parents will say it to their children every day. When they are going to visit a temple, or do a puja ceremony, or are fasting for a purpose - they will say that they are doing punyah karma. It can also be used while engaging in service, prayer, or charity work... Read More

Is A Yoga Teacher Training in India Right for You?

  • Post by Mavy
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  • 03 May 2019

“What should I expect?” is one of the many questions people around the world ask before booking a course with us or before coming to a class. We know that India is likely very far from your home. Australia, Russia and the United States are indeed quite far away, and it’s natural to have a lot of questions before making a commitment to coming to India.

Here at Punyah yoga, we prioritize the comfort of our students and strive to create an environment that is relaxing and serene while also stimulating the spiritual side of our students with the atmosphere and with open discussions. We want to accommodate our students who are used to western cleanliness and comforts, so our facilities are all clean and westernized, complete with hot water... Read More

Rishikesh the Yoga Capital of the World

  • Post by Mavy
  • |
  • 03 May 2019

Rishikesh is commonly referred to as the Yoga Capital of the World. But to some, Rishikesh is just another city in India— a far-off country that can be intimidating to imagine visiting.

Some people also, when thinking of doing yoga in India, are unsure of what the teaching style will be like. They may only be familiar with yoga classes in the West with Western teachers. It can be difficult to imagine showing up in a new country, with new teachers, at a new yoga shala unsure of what to expect.

We here at Punyah Yoga wanted to share our thoughts on what yoga in Rishikesh is really like.. Read More